Aircraft Wrecks: Examine the Possibilities!



Several days ago, I wrote up a short column about the many different ways a modeler can utilize destroyed armor in a diorama. It seemed to go over pretty well so I thought I'd offer up some references that will highlight some creative ways to use a wrecked aircraft for a scene.
In my opinion, the use of downed aircraft in dioramas is sorely lacking. There is probably one such scene for every four blown out tank dioramas. It probably has more to do with most aircraft modelers wanting to display their aircraft as naturally as possible and not as a hot mess like what you see above. Whatever the case may be, I hope this serves as some inspiration to get us thinking outside the box when it comes to destroying and displaying our model planes.

I don't have as organized a format to lay this post out like I did for the armor. I'm more interested is showcasing the different ways a wrecked plane can convey context in a certain scene. So, without further ado...Here we go!

You can always start very simply. There is nothing wrong with showing an aircraft that has recently been ditched due to battle damage, mechanical failure or the like. It wouldn't be unusual to have panels open, or missing so its the perfect option for aircraft modelers to showcase some scratch building skills without having to completely tear apart the model...



That may seem a bit too simple. One thing you can do is change the environment of your scene. Not all aircraft that had a hard landing went in with their wheels up on a flat hay field in France. Its okay to give the terrain some features, this way, if nothing else is going on in the scene, at least there is some elevation to move the eye. I particularly like the railroad tracks in the photo below...




 Or challenge yourself even more by adding a water feature...



Not enough water? Okay, well, if you're a Navy guy than you've got some other options as well...


Still not enough water? Now you're getting ambitious. One of these days I will attempt a scene similar to this...


Too much? How about an urban scene?






Much like some of the examples I provided in the wrecked armor post, the aircraft doesn't even have to be the main focus of the scene. Just having it in the background can imply a level of drama for the scene...


Or you can make it stand out even more if you wish to where it actually becomes the scenery...


Or to give your scene a sense of utter desolation, blend it into the environment completely...


Your scene can be a complicated mess, full of debris as far as the eye can see...


Or simple, a perhaps a little humorous...


Your wrecks can be fresh, or quite old and long forgotten...


And finally, you don't have to use planes from World War II either...


I could go on with this post for a long time. There are hundreds of photographs out there depicting aircraft in various states of disarray. The challenge is finding the right inspiration. Hopefully, I've at least provided that boost to some lucky reader. No matter what you do, just remember to have fun with it!
Thanks for reading!

Comments

  1. ..neat post ...I was planning a 'before and after' of von Werra's downed Emil, but I doubt I'll ever get around to the 'after' one...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You never know! I'd like to see that. Build them simultaneously

      Delete
  2. Again Jon I'm sure you have helped everyone with ideas, and you now gave me thinking as well with the motorsport side, good to think outside to square.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, I'd like to see you do a car wreck! That would be cool

      Delete

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