JAG Collective 1/700 USCGC Dallas: Redux - Part I


The PT Boat is finished and awaiting a proper base. I want to put it in water but I've never done a water feature that will cover that much area before (read: I'm apprehensive). So, I'm stalling a bit. My water skills aren't excellent but they're improving. Water can be hard to recreate convincingly, especially in larger scales, as the PT Boat is. I decided I needed to practice a bit to see what works best in small scale and apply it to 1/72.
So, I found the perfect project to work on in the mean time.

How about a little background information? Okay, sure. Many moons ago, not long after I started taking this hobby super seriously, I built a tiny model of the USCGC Dallas for my father-in-law as a gift. He was retiring from a long and successful career in the Coast Guard, and the Dallas was the first ship he'd sailed with.
After a lengthy search, I found a 1/700 resin kit boxed by JAG Collective of the USCGC Hamilton, which is the same class Cutter as the Dallas. Fortunately, the kit contains many different hull numbers to allow a modeler to create any of the Hamilton class vessels including the Dallas. I ordered the kit, and pretty soon I was hard at work building my first ship, as well as my first all resin kit.
Not only that but it comes with a poop-ton of little PE parts, a medium that, at the time, I was quite unfamiliar with. The final result was the best I could muster, considering my ineptitude, but I was pleased with it and as it would turn out, so was my father-in-law.

However, after a recent visit to his man cave I noticed that the model was no where to be seen. I located it, tucked away in a closet and immediately could see why it had been relegated to the house's equivalent of Davy Jones' locker...



I had used a small display case as the base, a good idea, but poorly executed. There were several holes in the base, allowing for screws or a mirror to be mounted, and these holes I did not fill. Instead, I glued a piece of matte board along the bottom to cover the holes and laid the plaster down on top of that which was molded to form the water. When the plaster dried, over time it warped the matte board and soon it started pulling away from the base, cracking the plaster. After a while, it looked how it does in the picture above. A careless oversight on my part is what lead to this model being rather un-displayable. I couldn't blame him. Its ugly.

So, I've taken it upon myself to fix it! I take pride in my work, you know.

I couldn't get all the plaster off the plastic display base, and I didn't want to simply go over the top of it because I had something else in mind to create the water. So I opted for a wooden base...


I started with a blend of oil paints to make a nice turquoise sea...


More blue added to the mix, then stippled into an area creates some shading, perhaps from a deeper portion of water...


You can see it a bit better here...


The opposite was done in the near corner by adding a lighter green to the mix, creating what hopefully appears to be shallower water...


The boat is in place...


The foundations of the wake are created using white oil paint...




Tonight I will be adding larger waves to the wake using milliput and following this example that Rich from Kermit's Bench shared with me the other day. It all seems simple enough and looks effective in the end. Hopefully I can pull it off.
Thanks for reading!

Comments

  1. Always glad to help! People still comment on that water dio i did with this technique

    ReplyDelete

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