Ashes to Ashes, Rust to Rust - Episode III


Well, yesterdayy i was a bit ill, stricken with a nasty cold and therefore quarantined. I missed worked, and my wife escaped to her parent's house with the children, far from me and whatever contagion by body is currently hosting. This left me with a quiet house, and no interruptions as I sat at the workbench in the middle of the day. I haven't had a daytime model session since before you were born...okay, since before my kids were born. Still, a long time either way, and I took advantage!


Prior to the afternoon's work, I finished up a few things the night before. As you know from Episode II, the engine was completed with no issues. The following night the chassis came together, along with the wheels, as you see here. The wheels are nicely detailed, including raised "Good Year" trademark along the tire walls. You see five in the picture, so the fifth wheel is obviously the spare and I will be leaving it off the final product where it will find it's place in the truck bed.
So, with that all complete, and with an afternoon's worth of time ahead of me, I returned my attention to the engine. It needed some paint...


 Well, that is all fine and dandy if this was a show room exhibit, but we both know that it isn't or else why would this project have the stupid name that it does? So, I gave it a wash, and a dry brush...



 But that isn't enough, is it? Nothing gets by you. Needs. More. Rust.
Well, let me pile it on then...


 I don't use a particular brand of pigments. I use different colored chalks that I grind up and powder on. In this case, several different shades of brown are used and applied with a bush and bonded with some thinner. In the end it looks like this...



 Creating this look took me all afternoon - about four hours. A long time for really only accomplishing one thing. I can't help it though, I a bit picky when it comes to how things look. At one point I thought I'd finished it but decided I didn't like the outcome so I redid it. Getting rust to look right, at least in my eyes, isn't easy. Getting texture and shades right is a pain. I do, however, like doing it. Turing plastic into rusty metal is quite fun.

Beyond that, I cut open the driver side door so that I could leave it ajar so as to get a better view of the interior once the model is completely assembled. This took a little while and I used just about every manner of sharp implement in my arsenal to pull it off. I'm always a bit tentative when doing something like this as the end result is quite permanent and difficult to correct should problems arise...



Looks like it should work out okay though.
The difficulty of vehicles is that they must be painted in increments. I believe my next step should be to paint the chassis, so I can fix the engine in place and finish with the radiator. But we'll see, otherwise I'll work on the interior of the little cab.
Thanks for reading!
Until next time.

Episode II
Episode I

Comments

  1. I really love the rusted engine block. Great work!

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